Montezuma

Montezuma

(*etwa um /°), im Spanischen auch Montezuma genannt, gehörte zu den Azteken, die im Jahrhundert weite Teile Mexikos beherrschten. Definition, Rechtschreibung, Synonyme und Grammatik von 'Montezuma' auf Duden online nachschlagen. Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache. Wenn von Moctezumas (oder: Montezumas) Rache die Rede ist, denkt jeder abgeklärte Fernreisende sofort an Durchfall, den er sich bei Aufenthalten in. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Montezuma IIalso spelled Moctezumaborn —died c. Samla dyrbara ädelstenar och leta efter värdefulla artefakter. Moctezuma had many wives and concubines by reef club casino no deposit bonus he fathered an enormous family. The Aztecs, disgusted by the Smile Slots - Play the Free NeoGames Casino Game Online of their leader, renounced Moctezuman and named Cuitlahuac in his place. Barack Obama, 44th president of the United States —17 and the Beste Spielothek in Tagmersheim finden African American to hold the…. During his absence, tensions between Spaniards and Aztecs exploded into the Massacre in the Great Templeand Moctezuma became a hostage used by the Spaniards to ensure Beste Spielothek in Utzstetten finden security. They came in two columns, pressed very close to the walls of the street, which is very wide and beautiful and so straight that you can see from one end to the other. Retrieved 22 May Moctezuma was aware Play Adventures in Wonderland Online | Grosvenor Casinos this and he sent gifts to the Spaniards, probably in order to show his superiority to the Spaniards and Tlaxcalteca. He was very neat and clean, and took a bath every afternoon.

Montezuma Video

The Mystical Villa Montezuma Mansion Montezuma, der von Anfang an über die Bewegungen der Spanier unterrichtet wurde, hatte mehrfach versucht, sie mit Gesandtschaften und magischen Ritualen vom Betreten seiner Hauptstadt abzuhalten. Er verfolgte damit zum einen das Ziel, die modeste gehalt seiner Herrschaft Beste Spielothek in Barme finden Durchgangswege sowie das Tal von Oaxaca, das reiche Tribute lieferte, zu sichern. Nachdem sie in ihrer sagenhaften Heimat Aztek aufgebrochen waren, kamen sie nach Colhuacan super six spiel unterwarfen sich. Der Gebäudekomplex besteht aus 20 Räumen, die sich über fünf Etagen in eine Slots - huuuge casino free slot machines games einpassen. Beste Spielothek in Schotta finden davon gab es in i am football Neuen Welt, die im Grunde eine Steinzeitzivilisation darstellte — Holzschwerter mit Obsidianklingen waren ihre mächtigsten Waffen. Dass Montezuma in diesem Reigen den Schlusspunkt markiert, kann man als geschichtsphilosophische Wendung in dem Sinne deuten, dass auch imperiale Allmacht nicht gegen plötzlichen und totalen Untergang gefeit ist. Dass Beste Spielothek in Fafleralp finden in diesem Reigen den Schlusspunkt markiert, kann man als geschichtsphilosophische Wendung in dem Sinne deuten, dass auch imperiale Allmacht nicht gegen plötzlichen und totalen Untergang gefeit ist. DBGBerlin ; S. Juni erneut die eingeschlossenen Spanier. Als erste Europäer wurden die Spanier auf die Behausungen aufmerksam.

Montezuma -

Zur Transformation von Legitimität in Geschichte und Gegenwart. Als der den Betrug erkannte, überzog er die Azteken mit Krieg und trieb sie wieder hinaus in die Welt. Deshalb sollen auch häufige Falschschreibweisen, die auf duden. Unterhaltsame Informationen zur deutschen Sprache oder lieber Informationen zu aktuellen Angeboten? Machu Picchu - was ist das eigentlich?

Regardless of the earlier orders to hold fire, however, the discussion between Moctezuma and the Aztec leaders was immediately followed by an outbreak of violence.

The Aztecs, disgusted by the actions of their leader, renounced Moctezuman and named Cuitlahuac in his place. In an effort to pacify his people, and undoubtedly pressured by the Spanish, Moctezuman was struck dead by a rock.

Indeed, when we least expected it, they came to say that he was dead. In Book 12 of the twelve-volume Florentine Codex , the account in Spanish and Nahuatl is accompanied by illustrations by natives.

One is of the death of Moctezuma II, which the indigenous assert was due to the Spaniards. According to the Codex, the bodies of Moctezuma and Itzquauhtzin were cast out of the Palace by the Spanish; the body of Moctezuma was gathered up and cremated at Copulco.

The Spaniards were forced to flee the city and they took refuge in Tlaxcala, and signed a treaty with them to conquer Tenochtitlan, offering to the Tlaxcalans freedom from any kind of tribute and the control of Tenochtitlan.

During the siege of the city, the sons of Moctezuma were murdered by the Aztecs, possibly because they wanted to surrender.

By the following year, the Aztec empire had fallen to an army of Spanish and their Native American allies, primarily Tlaxcalans who were traditional enemies of the Aztecs.

Following the conquest, Moctezuma's daughter, Techichpotzin or Tecuichpoch , became known as Isabel Moctezuma. Moctezuma had many wives and concubines by whom he fathered an enormous family.

Though the exact number of his children is unknown and the names of most of his children were lost to history, according to a Spanish chronicler, by the time he was taken captive, Moctezuma had fathered children and fifty of his wives and concubines were then in some stage of pregnancy, though this estimate may have been exaggerated.

Of his many wives may be named the princesses Teitlalco, Acatlan, and Miahuaxochitl, of whom the first named appears to have been the only legitimate consort.

By her he left a son, Asupacaci, who fell during the Noche Triste , and a daughter, Tecuichpo , baptized as Isabel, married consecutively to Cuauhtemoc the last Mexican sovereign , to visitador general Alonso Grado, to Pedro Andrade Gallego, and to Juan Cano de Saavedra.

She had children by the latter two, from whom descend the illustrious families of Andrade-Montezuma and Cano-Montezuma. The latter alone left offspring, from whom descends the Sotelo-Montezuma family.

There he married Francisca de la Cueva de Valenzuela. In , the holder of the title became a Grandee of Spain. Other holders of Spanish noble titles that descend from the Aztec emperor include Dukes of Atrisco.

Many Indigenous peoples in Mexico are reported to worship deities named after the Aztec ruler, and often a part of the myth is that someday the deified Moctezuma shall return to vindicate his people.

Hubert Howe Bancroft , writing in the 19th century Native Races , Volume 3 , speculated that the name of the historical Aztec Emperor Moctezuma had been used to refer to a combination of different cultural heroes who were united under the name of a particularly salient representative of Mesoamerican identity.

As a symbol of resistance towards Spanish the name of Moctezuma has been invoked in several indigenous rebellions.

One such example was the rebellion of the Virgin Cult in Chiapas in , where the followers of the Virgin Mary rebelled against the Spanish after having been told by an apparition of the virgin that Moctezuma would be resuscitated to assist them against their Spanish oppressors.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Moctezuma's Palace from the Codex Mendoza Civilization of the American Indian series, no. University of Oklahoma Press.

The Penguin history of Latin America. Introduction to Classical Nahuatl. Translated by Anthony Pagden. Yale UP, , p. Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

The History of the Conquest of New Spain. University of New Mexico Press. Retrieved 22 May Retrieved October 18, University of Texas Press , p.

Aztec Royalty Under Spanish Rule, Struggle and Survival in Colonial America 1st ed. University of California Press. Retrieved 16 November Archived from the original on March 4, Aztec royalty under Spanish rule, —".

The Fair God or the Last of the 'Tzins. Archived from the original PDF on Aztec Royalty Under Spanish rule, University of Texas Press. On the Lips of Others: Moteuczoma's Fame in Aztec Monuments and Rituals.

University of Texas Press Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. The British Museum Press. The Aztecs 2nd edition, revised ed.

Weaver, Muriel Porter The Aztecs, Maya, and Their Predecessors: Archaeology of Mesoamerica 3rd ed. Retrieved from " https: Tenochca tlatoque Moctezuma family 16th-century rulers 16th-century monarchs in North America 15th-century indigenous people of the Americas 16th-century indigenous people of the Americas 16th-century Mexican people s births deaths 16th-century murdered monarchs crimes s in the Aztec civilization s in the Aztec civilization s in the Aztec civilization 15th century in the Aztec civilization 16th century in the Aztec civilization in North America.

Mutezuma came down the middle of this street with two chiefs, one on his right hand and the other on his left.

And they were all dressed alike except that Mutezuma wore sandals whereas the others went barefoot; and they held his arm on either side.

He describes Moctezuma's issue and counts that Moctezuma had nineteen children — eleven sons and eight daughters.

These were purportedly interpreted as signs of a possible disaster, e. Some speculate that the Aztecs were particularly susceptible to such ideas of doom and disaster because the particular year in which the Spanish arrived coincided with a "tying of years" ceremony at the end of a year cycle in the Aztec calendar, which in Aztec belief was linked to changes, rebirth, and dangerous events.

The belief of the Aztecs being rendered passive by their own superstition is referred to by Matthew Restall as part of "The Myth of Native Desolation" to which he dedicates chapter 6 in his book Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

Ethnohistorian Susan Gillespie has argued that the Nahua understanding of history as repeating itself in cycles also led to a subsequent rationalization of the events of the conquests.

In this interpretation the description of Moctezuma, the final ruler of the Aztec Empire prior to the Spanish conquest, was tailored to fit the role of earlier rulers of ending dynasties—for example Quetzalcoatl, the mythical last ruler of the Toltecs.

Moctezuma ordered that he be kept informed of any new sightings of foreigners at the coast and posted extra watch guards to accomplish this.

As the Spaniards approached Tenochtitlan they made an alliance with the Tlaxcalteca , who were enemies of the Aztec Triple Alliance, and they helped instigate revolt in many towns under Aztec dominion.

Moctezuma was aware of this and he sent gifts to the Spaniards, probably in order to show his superiority to the Spaniards and Tlaxcalteca.

Though some indigenous accounts written in the s partly supported his words, it is still unbelievable for several reasons.

As Aztec rulers spoke an overly polite language that needed translation for his subjects to understand, it is difficult to find out what Moctezuma really said.

According to an indigenous account, he said to Cortes: What Moctezuma really meant could be to assert his own stature and multigenerational legitimacy.

Also, according to the Spanish law, the king had no right to demand that foreign peoples become his subjects, but he had every right to bring rebels to heel.

Therefore, to give the Spanish the necessary legitimacy to wage war against the indigenous people, Cortes might just have said what the Spanish king needed to hear.

Moctezuma continued to govern his empire and even undertook conquests of new territory during the Spaniards' stay at Tenochtitlan.

At some time during that period, Moctezuma became a prisoner in his own house. Exactly why this happened is not clear from the extant sources.

During his absence, tensions between Spaniards and Aztecs exploded into the Massacre in the Great Temple , and Moctezuma became a hostage used by the Spaniards to ensure their security.

The details of his death are unknown, with different versions of his demise given by different sources. Four leaders of the Aztec army met with Moctezuma to talk, urging their countrymen to cease their constant firing upon the stronghold for a time.

Regardless of the earlier orders to hold fire, however, the discussion between Moctezuma and the Aztec leaders was immediately followed by an outbreak of violence.

The Aztecs, disgusted by the actions of their leader, renounced Moctezuman and named Cuitlahuac in his place. In an effort to pacify his people, and undoubtedly pressured by the Spanish, Moctezuman was struck dead by a rock.

Indeed, when we least expected it, they came to say that he was dead. In Book 12 of the twelve-volume Florentine Codex , the account in Spanish and Nahuatl is accompanied by illustrations by natives.

One is of the death of Moctezuma II, which the indigenous assert was due to the Spaniards. According to the Codex, the bodies of Moctezuma and Itzquauhtzin were cast out of the Palace by the Spanish; the body of Moctezuma was gathered up and cremated at Copulco.

The Spaniards were forced to flee the city and they took refuge in Tlaxcala, and signed a treaty with them to conquer Tenochtitlan, offering to the Tlaxcalans freedom from any kind of tribute and the control of Tenochtitlan.

During the siege of the city, the sons of Moctezuma were murdered by the Aztecs, possibly because they wanted to surrender. By the following year, the Aztec empire had fallen to an army of Spanish and their Native American allies, primarily Tlaxcalans who were traditional enemies of the Aztecs.

Following the conquest, Moctezuma's daughter, Techichpotzin or Tecuichpoch , became known as Isabel Moctezuma. Moctezuma had many wives and concubines by whom he fathered an enormous family.

Though the exact number of his children is unknown and the names of most of his children were lost to history, according to a Spanish chronicler, by the time he was taken captive, Moctezuma had fathered children and fifty of his wives and concubines were then in some stage of pregnancy, though this estimate may have been exaggerated.

Of his many wives may be named the princesses Teitlalco, Acatlan, and Miahuaxochitl, of whom the first named appears to have been the only legitimate consort.

By her he left a son, Asupacaci, who fell during the Noche Triste , and a daughter, Tecuichpo , baptized as Isabel, married consecutively to Cuauhtemoc the last Mexican sovereign , to visitador general Alonso Grado, to Pedro Andrade Gallego, and to Juan Cano de Saavedra.

She had children by the latter two, from whom descend the illustrious families of Andrade-Montezuma and Cano-Montezuma. The latter alone left offspring, from whom descends the Sotelo-Montezuma family.

There he married Francisca de la Cueva de Valenzuela. In , the holder of the title became a Grandee of Spain. Other holders of Spanish noble titles that descend from the Aztec emperor include Dukes of Atrisco.

Many Indigenous peoples in Mexico are reported to worship deities named after the Aztec ruler, and often a part of the myth is that someday the deified Moctezuma shall return to vindicate his people.

Hubert Howe Bancroft , writing in the 19th century Native Races , Volume 3 , speculated that the name of the historical Aztec Emperor Moctezuma had been used to refer to a combination of different cultural heroes who were united under the name of a particularly salient representative of Mesoamerican identity.

As a symbol of resistance towards Spanish the name of Moctezuma has been invoked in several indigenous rebellions. One such example was the rebellion of the Virgin Cult in Chiapas in , where the followers of the Virgin Mary rebelled against the Spanish after having been told by an apparition of the virgin that Moctezuma would be resuscitated to assist them against their Spanish oppressors.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Moctezuma's Palace from the Codex Mendoza Civilization of the American Indian series, no. University of Oklahoma Press.

The Penguin history of Latin America. Introduction to Classical Nahuatl. Translated by Anthony Pagden. Yale UP, , p. Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

The History of the Conquest of New Spain. University of New Mexico Press. Retrieved 22 May

Montezuma -

Wenn Sie fortfahren, stimmen Sie der Verwendung unserer Cookies zu. Ebenso spielten die spanischen Reiter eine Rolle, denn sie verschafften der Truppe einen Vorteil an Mobilität — Reittiere oder gar Pferde waren zu dieser Zeit in Amerika vollkommen unbekannt. Flughäfen in der Umgebung 1. Auf der anderen Seite sollten die bereits unterworfenen Völker durch die Demonstration der militärischen Macht der Azteken eingeschüchtert werden. Kalapiti Luxury Jungle Suites. Überblick Unterkünfte Standort Aktivitäten Mehr. Insel-Verlag, Frankfurt am Main , S. Die Erinnerung an die aztekische Niederlage schmerzt im mexikanischen Geschichtsbewusstsein bis zum heutigen Tag. In dem verwirrenden Geflecht der Überlieferung wird immer wieder auf die Glaubensfestigkeit Montezumas verwiesen. Dieser Artikel wurde am Juni erneut die eingeschlossenen Spanier. Der Fluch, der ihn damit traf, erinnert an den der hellenischen Atriden, deren Stammvater Atreus seinem Bruder einst das gebratene Fleisch seiner Kinder vorgesetzt hatte. Navigation Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Nachdem sie in ihrer sagenhaften Heimat Aztek aufgebrochen waren, kamen sie nach Colhuacan und unterwarfen sich. Dieser jedoch stellte sich sogleich an die Spitze der Aufständischen und belagerte am Moctezuma versuchte mit allen Mitteln, die Spanier von ihrem Vorhaben abzubringen, ihn aufzusuchen: Als in Texcoco Thronstreitigkeiten ausbrachen, griff Montezuma in die Innenpolitik des Partners ein und setzte seinen Neffen auf den Thron. Auflage, Frankfurt am Main , S. Doch ist der Grund für seine Platzierung wohl prosaischer: Es hat nichts genutzt. Nach den Feldzügen gegen Oaxaca konzentrierte sich Moctezuma auf die Schwächung der Tlaxcalteken und ihrer Verbündeten. Verschieben Sie die Karte oder ändern Sie die Filteroptionen.

The portrayal of Moctezuma in history has mostly been colored by his role as ruler of a defeated nation, and many sources describe him as weak-willed and indecisive.

The biases of some historical sources make it difficult to understand his actions during the Spanish invasion. Moctezuma had many wives and concubines but only two women were his Queens — Tlapalizquixochtzin and Teotlalco.

His many children included Princess Isabel Moctezuma — and sons Chimalpopoca not to be confused with the previous huey tlatoani and Tlaltecatzin. It is a compound of a noun meaning "lord" and a verb meaning "to frown in anger", and so is interpreted as "he is one who frowns like a lord" [4] or "he who is angry in a noble manner.

His name glyph , shown in the upper left corner of the image from the Codex Mendoza above, was composed of a diadem xiuhuitzolli on straight hair with an attached earspool , a separate nosepiece and a speech scroll.

The Aztecs did not use regnal numbers ; they were given retroactively by historians to more easily distinguish him from the first Moctezuma, referred to as Moctezuma I.

The descriptions of the life of Moctezuma are full of contradictions, and thus nothing is known for certain about his personality and rule.

The Great Montezuma was about forty years old, of good height, well proportioned, spare and slight, and not very dark, though of the usual Indian complexion.

He did not wear his hair long but just over his ears, and he had a short black beard, well-shaped and thin. His face was rather long and cheerful, he had fine eyes, and in his appearance and manner could express geniality or, when necessary, a serious composure.

He was very neat and clean, and took a bath every afternoon. He had many women as his mistresses, the daughters of chieftains, but two legitimate wives who were Caciques [N.

He was quite free from sodomy. The clothes he wore one day he did not wear again till three or four days later. He had a guard of two hundred chieftains lodged in rooms beside his own, only some of whom were permitted to speak to him.

It was stated that he had reigned for seventeen years, and was the best king they ever had in Mexico, and that he had personally triumphed in three wars against countries he had subjugated.

I have spoken of the sorrow we all felt when we saw that Montezuma was dead. We even blamed the Mercederian friar for not having persuaded him to become a Christian.

Moctezuma in particular is depicted unfavorably as a weak-willed, superstitious, and indulgent ruler. His prose is characterized by simple descriptions and explanations, along with frequent personal addresses to the King.

Mutezuma [ sic ] came to greet us and with him some two hundred lords, all barefoot and dressed in a different costume, but also very rich in their way and more so than the others.

They came in two columns, pressed very close to the walls of the street, which is very wide and beautiful and so straight that you can see from one end to the other.

Mutezuma came down the middle of this street with two chiefs, one on his right hand and the other on his left.

And they were all dressed alike except that Mutezuma wore sandals whereas the others went barefoot; and they held his arm on either side.

He describes Moctezuma's issue and counts that Moctezuma had nineteen children — eleven sons and eight daughters.

These were purportedly interpreted as signs of a possible disaster, e. Some speculate that the Aztecs were particularly susceptible to such ideas of doom and disaster because the particular year in which the Spanish arrived coincided with a "tying of years" ceremony at the end of a year cycle in the Aztec calendar, which in Aztec belief was linked to changes, rebirth, and dangerous events.

The belief of the Aztecs being rendered passive by their own superstition is referred to by Matthew Restall as part of "The Myth of Native Desolation" to which he dedicates chapter 6 in his book Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

Ethnohistorian Susan Gillespie has argued that the Nahua understanding of history as repeating itself in cycles also led to a subsequent rationalization of the events of the conquests.

In this interpretation the description of Moctezuma, the final ruler of the Aztec Empire prior to the Spanish conquest, was tailored to fit the role of earlier rulers of ending dynasties—for example Quetzalcoatl, the mythical last ruler of the Toltecs.

Moctezuma ordered that he be kept informed of any new sightings of foreigners at the coast and posted extra watch guards to accomplish this. As the Spaniards approached Tenochtitlan they made an alliance with the Tlaxcalteca , who were enemies of the Aztec Triple Alliance, and they helped instigate revolt in many towns under Aztec dominion.

Moctezuma was aware of this and he sent gifts to the Spaniards, probably in order to show his superiority to the Spaniards and Tlaxcalteca.

Though some indigenous accounts written in the s partly supported his words, it is still unbelievable for several reasons.

As Aztec rulers spoke an overly polite language that needed translation for his subjects to understand, it is difficult to find out what Moctezuma really said.

According to an indigenous account, he said to Cortes: What Moctezuma really meant could be to assert his own stature and multigenerational legitimacy.

Also, according to the Spanish law, the king had no right to demand that foreign peoples become his subjects, but he had every right to bring rebels to heel.

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Kalapiti Luxury Jungle Suites. Map updates are paused. Zoom in to see updated info. He had a guard of two hundred chieftains lodged in rooms beside his own, only some of whom were permitted to speak to him.

It was stated that he had reigned for seventeen years, and was the best king they ever had in Mexico, and that he had personally triumphed in three wars against countries he had subjugated.

I have spoken of the sorrow we all felt when we saw that Montezuma was dead. We even blamed the Mercederian friar for not having persuaded him to become a Christian.

Moctezuma in particular is depicted unfavorably as a weak-willed, superstitious, and indulgent ruler. His prose is characterized by simple descriptions and explanations, along with frequent personal addresses to the King.

Mutezuma [ sic ] came to greet us and with him some two hundred lords, all barefoot and dressed in a different costume, but also very rich in their way and more so than the others.

They came in two columns, pressed very close to the walls of the street, which is very wide and beautiful and so straight that you can see from one end to the other.

Mutezuma came down the middle of this street with two chiefs, one on his right hand and the other on his left.

And they were all dressed alike except that Mutezuma wore sandals whereas the others went barefoot; and they held his arm on either side.

He describes Moctezuma's issue and counts that Moctezuma had nineteen children — eleven sons and eight daughters. These were purportedly interpreted as signs of a possible disaster, e.

Some speculate that the Aztecs were particularly susceptible to such ideas of doom and disaster because the particular year in which the Spanish arrived coincided with a "tying of years" ceremony at the end of a year cycle in the Aztec calendar, which in Aztec belief was linked to changes, rebirth, and dangerous events.

The belief of the Aztecs being rendered passive by their own superstition is referred to by Matthew Restall as part of "The Myth of Native Desolation" to which he dedicates chapter 6 in his book Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest.

Ethnohistorian Susan Gillespie has argued that the Nahua understanding of history as repeating itself in cycles also led to a subsequent rationalization of the events of the conquests.

In this interpretation the description of Moctezuma, the final ruler of the Aztec Empire prior to the Spanish conquest, was tailored to fit the role of earlier rulers of ending dynasties—for example Quetzalcoatl, the mythical last ruler of the Toltecs.

Moctezuma ordered that he be kept informed of any new sightings of foreigners at the coast and posted extra watch guards to accomplish this.

As the Spaniards approached Tenochtitlan they made an alliance with the Tlaxcalteca , who were enemies of the Aztec Triple Alliance, and they helped instigate revolt in many towns under Aztec dominion.

Moctezuma was aware of this and he sent gifts to the Spaniards, probably in order to show his superiority to the Spaniards and Tlaxcalteca.

Though some indigenous accounts written in the s partly supported his words, it is still unbelievable for several reasons. As Aztec rulers spoke an overly polite language that needed translation for his subjects to understand, it is difficult to find out what Moctezuma really said.

According to an indigenous account, he said to Cortes: What Moctezuma really meant could be to assert his own stature and multigenerational legitimacy.

Also, according to the Spanish law, the king had no right to demand that foreign peoples become his subjects, but he had every right to bring rebels to heel.

Therefore, to give the Spanish the necessary legitimacy to wage war against the indigenous people, Cortes might just have said what the Spanish king needed to hear.

Moctezuma continued to govern his empire and even undertook conquests of new territory during the Spaniards' stay at Tenochtitlan.

At some time during that period, Moctezuma became a prisoner in his own house. Exactly why this happened is not clear from the extant sources.

During his absence, tensions between Spaniards and Aztecs exploded into the Massacre in the Great Temple , and Moctezuma became a hostage used by the Spaniards to ensure their security.

The details of his death are unknown, with different versions of his demise given by different sources. Four leaders of the Aztec army met with Moctezuma to talk, urging their countrymen to cease their constant firing upon the stronghold for a time.

Regardless of the earlier orders to hold fire, however, the discussion between Moctezuma and the Aztec leaders was immediately followed by an outbreak of violence.

The Aztecs, disgusted by the actions of their leader, renounced Moctezuman and named Cuitlahuac in his place. In an effort to pacify his people, and undoubtedly pressured by the Spanish, Moctezuman was struck dead by a rock.

Indeed, when we least expected it, they came to say that he was dead. In Book 12 of the twelve-volume Florentine Codex , the account in Spanish and Nahuatl is accompanied by illustrations by natives.

One is of the death of Moctezuma II, which the indigenous assert was due to the Spaniards. According to the Codex, the bodies of Moctezuma and Itzquauhtzin were cast out of the Palace by the Spanish; the body of Moctezuma was gathered up and cremated at Copulco.

The Spaniards were forced to flee the city and they took refuge in Tlaxcala, and signed a treaty with them to conquer Tenochtitlan, offering to the Tlaxcalans freedom from any kind of tribute and the control of Tenochtitlan.

Dream Chronicles Classic games Mystery games. Archaeology of Mesoamerica 3rd ed. What Moctezuma really meant could be to assert his own stature and multigenerational legitimacy. The descriptions of the life of Moctezuma are full of contradictions, Beste Spielothek in Edelsbrunngraben finden thus nothing is known for certain about his personality and rule. What are you still waiting for? Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. Disambiguation pages Place name disambiguation pages Disambiguation pages with given-name-holder lists Disambiguation pages with surname-holder lists. The History is dunder casino safe the Conquest of New Spain. According to Spanish accounts, he attempted to speak to his subjects and was assailed with stones and arrows, suffering reef club casino no deposit bonus from which he died three days later. Swap games Block games. ETEC smittar genom intag av fekalt kontaminerad föda eller vatten, och är vanligast förekommande i underutvecklade länder. Skulle du rekommendera det här spelet till andra spelare? Var medveten om att vi använder cookies för att ge dig bästa möjliga upplevelse. It is a compound of a noun meaning "lord" and a verb meaning "to Beste Spielothek in Farnbach finden in anger", and so Beste Spielothek in Kassuhn finden interpreted as "he is one who frowns like a lord" [4] or "he who is angry in a noble manner. Mahatma Bilder von ribery, Indian lawyer, politician, social activist, and writer who became the leader of the nationalist….

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